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Italian suggestions


#1

Hi guys,

I have a couple of suggestions for your Flow Hive.
Actually we do already use this “tips” with our Dadant Blatt hives.

  1. We attach the bottom board to the brood box like the following picture. It is much easier to move the hive then.

  1. We use a “portcullis” (I don’t know how to translate it in english) at the hive entrance, you can remove it in summer or close it in winter or during a robbing to reduce the entrance.

porticina-in-lamiera-saracinesca-dentata-estate-inverno-arnia-12-favi

  1. It could be useful to add an “angolar bracket” between the brood box and the super, so the entire hive would be more stable during the movement.

angolari-in-lamiera

Cheers from Italy :wink:


#2

The boxed or framed entrance is interesting. You would need a wider seat for the hive to accommodate the box/frame which I assume just backs up onto the front of the hive. Would give the entrance better winter protection.
With regard the angle brackets which I think is a good idea, I am amazed beekeepers have not adopted even straight guides on the sides for better and easier positioning of the boxes when putting them back.


#3

I wouldn’t like to have guides or brackets as I like to rotate the box into position to push any bees on the edges out of the way without squashing them?

@Luca I use clips just like yours to secure my base to the brood box. I find it is handy to stop the brood box moving off the base if I try and remove a super that is glued on.

I really like the Italian hives with built on ‘portcullis’ or front area. I think they are great for the reason you mentioned but also for transporting hives as bees come come out into the ‘porch’ area if the hive is hot and crowded. I plan to make some brood boxes in the Italian style but using langstroth frames.


#4

Hi Semaphore,

Thanks for your reply.
Regarding the brackets issue actually I would use them only between the brood box and the first super (in this case the flow hive super).
I usually rotate the queen excluder on the brood box. Then, if you are quick enough, there will be no bees on the queen excluder so you have low risk of squashing bees. And for sure the smoke helps :wink:

However this brackets are probably more important when used with the inner cover.
I mean, the super is quite heavy so it will not move when placed on the brood box. The inner cover is quite light and could move when placing the roof.


#5

Mine is so sticky with propolis that it doesn’t seem to move even if nudged! :blush:


#6

Eheh yes correct Dawn, I’m talking about first times :wink: