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Newbie Thinkin! :)


#1

O.K. Southwest Indiana, this is what I am thinking Deep brood box x 2 and a Medium box 1 no queen excluder for the first season, then next year 2018 queen excluder and 7 flow hive frames. So basically no honey first year then add excluder and let them fill the flow hive for a harvest, I think they will have plenty of supplies for food in the 3 boxes. Is this the right thinking or am totally off. Thanks for any and all input


#2

I’m not in the Northern hemisphere but why would you not put an excluder in place between your two brood boxes and the medium super? From what I’ve read here two brood boxes are needed/common in cold climates so I understand that, but I’m not sure of the logic for why no excluder?? The bees can move freely and will move food stores around as needed.

Also, judging by what you have explained I’m guessing you are using an L-10 (Langstroth 10 frame)?


#3

Bernie,

Your two deeps n one medium are 8 or 10 frame Langstroth hives ? Each region has certain nectar n pollen times. Depending on when you recieve your Nuc or Bee package, weather n more you’ll introduce them into the brood box. They’ll build brood n honey comb ( sometimes slow n sometimes rapidly) first. As this lower brood box get at or near 85% built n filled add the second deep box… If your real real lucky as that second box reaches 85% n it’s not late in the season add your medium. I’d personally install the QE but that’s your choice this 2917 season.

I’d find a local bee group or club for reinforcement help. I found having a mentor was very helpful to bouces ideas off n for resources since you’ll only be starting a single hive. I started with three here in Washington state. I was able to able to steal from one stronger hive n give to a weaker several times. Also I lost a queen n was able to take brood n the colony raise their own. But multiable hives was my idea.

Thing are much different raising honeybees now into the day n ages of several diseases n mites issues we didn’t have back in the 1950’s n 60’s so glad I got local help n knowledge from great mentor.

Good luck n keep on studying,
Gerald


#4

I am in Montana and the majority of beekeepers here run two deeps at a minimum. Some do have a medium super on them as well. I don’t see an issue putting the excluder between the upper deep and the medium super if you only wanted honey in the super but come winter you definitely want to remove the excluder. If you don’t have any plans to harvest any of the honey on the super frames then you don’t have to worry about the excluder.

The only other advice I would give you is to consider starting two hives instead of one. I originally was going to only start with one and I am glad I didnt. First having two hives you get to see different things that the bees are doing. Second I had one hive swarm. Having the second hive I was able to move resources (ie, brood, nectar, honey) from the strong hive to the weak one. Third, I got more experience with the bees and it helped me save the other hive when the one swarmed.

It did add some additional time having to inspect two hives but all in all it was not that bad. The other benefit is not having to spend more money to get more bees you can hopefully reproduce you own with bees and eggs from the other hive.


#5

Ahh, Thank you I didn’t realize they would move honey stores down as needed, then I would for sure and use the excluder before the medium box. Do you even think the medium box would be needed if not putting the flow hive on the first year. Although it may help to build a bigger and better bee colony. Thank You


#6

Thanks! Awesome to get good advice on here. Great Pic


#7

I don’t live in a cold climate so my comment that follows is based on what I’ve read of the experiences of others…

I would be inclined to keep the medium super on, assuming it is at least 2/3 full of honey and/or pollen. This will help provide adequate food supplies for the bees during winter. If it isn’t at least 2/3 full I would remove it to reduce the physical space the bees have to keep warm.