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Queen cells /swarm cells in new hive need help please

Hi I have a new hive my 1st hive it came in a 5 frame nuke moved it to a brood box and it’s been about 4 to 5 weeks now I’ve added a 2nd box once 7 or 8 of the frames were drawn out but have queen or swarm cells on it not sure what I should do if anything? Uploading: F5416236-9AB2-4A6E-ADF2-7E28BB80F422.jpeg… Uploading: FD525182-A259-45A9-8398-3694F9E8E319.jpeg… Uploading: D17AB76C-B747-4537-B068-7B1F6C1F8215.jpeg… Uploading: 2E9D4133-269F-4BFB-A26E-03E0B43E539C.jpeg… Uploading: B5DE3F2E-14AC-4005-89C5-B3875E64A7F5.jpeg…
Thank u :pray:

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Hello @Bridget and welcome to the Flow forum. Your photos would be immensely helpful, but unfortunately they did not upload. Might I suggest that you try again and wait… (can take a minute or two) until the “uploading” notifier disappears. The system can be a bit slow sometimes to receive your pictures, particularly in rural settings or on mobile devices. Once we get a good look, we can help you more! :blush:

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Welcome to the forum Bridget. Lots of help and advice here to help you along.
I agree with Dawn, the photos didn’t transfer. Maybe the photo files were too large and need ‘crunching’ to reduce the file size, if you can repost the photos that would be a help.
Cheers

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Great pics, thanks Bridget :+1: Those queen cells look like emergency or supercedure cells to me the way they’re positioned on different places on the face of the frame. Usually - but not 100% of the time - swarm cells are all along the bottom edge of a frame. Have you seen the queen your nuc came with recently, or any fresh eggs?

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I have seen eggs about 3 days ago. But haven’t seen the queen This is my 1st hive I’ve read books before I got them but not good at spotting her yet do you think it’s ok? Read somewhere that I should order a new queen if there trying to replace but not sure?

I would guess by your timing that your colony wants a new queen, and unless you have Africanized bees in your area I would advise letting them carry on with their plans. Beekeepers in areas with Africanized bees have to control colony reproduction to avoid more spread of these highly aggressive genes. Another consideration for replacing your queen with a bought one is honey yield, which many traditional beekeepers base their advice on, because when it’s done properly and timely, a colony has a better chance of quickly returning to brood rearing and stronger foraging while the nectar flow is on. So what to do all depends on what your aims are as a beekeeper.

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That’s the pics I was looking for Bridget. It is too late to do a preemptive split for swarm control in my opinion, I’m not a firm believer that the position of a queen cell defines the thinking of the colony. If the pic of the capped brood is an average and there is more then the queen is doing her job, laying brood, so I doubt it is a supercedure issue, more likely making towards swarming.
I would offer a brood box with frames of foundation close to the hive and maybe the scout bees will find it and move the swarm into it.
Some bee keepers even after years find it really hard to spot a queen, so maybe another bee keeper in your area could help you in finding her and marking her. Then she will be easily spotted, she will be marked for her age and further on if the hive has an unmarked queen you know the marked queen has gone with a swarm or has died.
With eggs 3 days old if the queen is dead then you have no reason to buy a queen so let nature do her thing, The only but is if the colony is continually aggressive then buying a new queen and crushing the queen cells is a wise choice. But make sure you have found every queen cell.
Cheers

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