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Trap out- brand new beekeeper

Feeling good about the backyard hive, I just saw the queen. I didn’t look through all the frames since I work kind of slow and didn’t want to disturb them too much. But now that I know she is there, I think it is moving along in the right direction they have plenty of room to grow also and have been building comb fast!

As far as the trap out, I’ve been making some modifications, and I think I am getting results. I ended up attaching the funnel to the nuc box, with it extending inside the box so they can’t get back in. I am now seeing more what I expected, congregations of bees on the side of the house and they are also going in and out of the box a lot. Not just for checking out the food I had before.

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Can you take and share a picture of the queen the next time you are in there. I am a bit sceptical that she came out of the wall to go into your Nuc sized box to be honest. Did you have anything in the Nuc box like sugar syrup or honey or comb?

Sorry that wasn’t clear, the new queen was in my hive out in the backyard, not the nuc box that is part of the trap out. I’m fairly confident that the one in the house is still there (in the house walls).

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I’m with you about the queen leaving the brood area Tim. While trap outs can be successful sometimes the queen simply won’t leave in which case a frame of eggs is needed for the bees to produce a new queen.
Cheers

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So the trap out seems to be at least keeping the bees out. I’ll check on them in a little bit to see if they go into the nuc box more. But here is the latest- the bees are bearding on the front of the nuc box, and a few small groups on the side of the house.

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I’m trying to figure out how many bees are out of the house now. I contacted the beekeeper I bought the nuc from in mid- April to see about how many pounds of bees was in the nuc. Then if about 50-60% left with the split about a month and half later.

I currently do not have brood to give to the trap out. My backyard hive has a queen now, and will likely start laying, if she hasn’t already, so I could potentially take some from them, but that would take more time. I think everything I read says open brood is best.

The other option would be to supply the bees that are out with a new queen. I know someone local that recently purchased a queen they didn’t end up needing. I could also buy one for those bees. What I have read is that the new queen may lure the old one out, or if not that, then the new queen replaces the old and the remainder in the house would die out. Or none of that works. The bees stuck outside the house are definitely behaving as a queenless colony. The temperament difference is amazing!

If the reason you are adding a frame of brood is so the bees can produce a new queen then the frame must contain eggs or larvae up to 3 days old, if the frame is just as a lure then any open brood is better than capped brood. Sure, it will add some time to the job but it will help it to be a success. At some time you will need to separate the nuc from the bees in the wall, it is hard to say when but after a week or 10 days I figure any bees that will transfer to the nuc will have done it. Once you remove the funnel you need to be positive there in no way for bees to get back into the wall where very likely the original queen will still be there with some attendants and nurse bees… More often than not a queen won’t leave where she can lay eggs with the exception in a swarming situation, of course, but not in a trap out.
Cheers

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Given my newness to beekeeping, do you think it would be better for me to add a new queen to the nuc bees after I wait a week or so to get as many out as possible? Instead of trying to take brood from my other hive that just got a new queen.

While the queen is emitting her pheromones from inside the wall you are going to have a really challenging time rescuing the bees and keeping them unless you take them 7 miles away to a new box with a queen there or brood from your Nuc colony. You are going to have to open that wall I’m afraid in order to get the queen out and whatever brood is now in there— that problem is the priority or this is going to go on for a while with a bad result. I know you don’t want to hear that but the facts will prove Peter48 and I are trying to save you from disaster down the line. If you can get the hive out of the wall then you are good with a new box— if you kill her in the process you best combine the bees from the wall into your original hive and call it a day. Like Peter said, you have to seal the cracks going on at your house or they will find a way in.

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