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Winter Feeding replacement for pollen


#1

Hi There, this was a bad pollen year in Denver, CO with a terrible loss of trees last winter and then snow in early spring preventing most trees and bushes from blooming at all. No fruit on most trees this year because of it. I think my bees are set for honey, but any ideas on how to supplement their pollen/protein over winter? I lost a colony two years ago because of not enough pollen. I fear pollen patties will be too difficult to eat in the cold not to mention that I don’t want to open up the hive until spring. Gotta keep the ladies warm.

Ideas? Suggestions? Prep pollen patties now and put them in before it’s too cold, hoping they will nibble on them on warm days? Don’t worry about it?


#2

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#3

Is there a min temp bees can survive?
We had temps down into single digits at night for about 2 wks in dec and
when I checked on my bees, they were lifeless.
A bit heartbroken as I will start a fresh hive in spring…


#4

People keep bees in Alaska and Finland. I think when it is really cold, they do better in polystyrene (plastic) hives. However, there has been a lot of discussion that the major killer of bees in cold weather is condensation inside the hive - when water drips on them and freezes, it is lethal.


#5

You need to tell us how you found your bees then maybe we can make a diagnosis. That way you can avoid problems in the future.
As Dawn said…
Was the inside of the hive damp?
Did they have any stores and where in relation to the bees were they?
Were the dead bees just clustered on the frames or were they head down in the cells?
Were there dead bees on the floor?
That might do for a start.
Bad luck…always horrid to see a colony die.


#6

I will chk and let you know
Agreed!


#7

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#8

thank you Jape. There was no visible condensation or ice when I choked hive


#9

Yes, isolation starvation. Food in the box but bees heads down in empty cells.