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Flow hive honey - higher price?

I’ve read somewhere that honey from flow was selling for more money because it’s straight from the comb without processing and heating from uncapping. Does anyone know any posts or articles about this?

Firstly not all honey extracted is involving any heat applied, some use an unheated knife and most use an unheated extractor unless they are in a really cold climate. Some claim that honey from a flow frame is more pure as it isn’t tainted by as much expose to the air. Some claim that their honey is ‘organic honey’.
Most of that in my opinion is just marketing hype and might increase honey sales and price.
I generally use a heated knife that is heat controlled and my extractor is not a heated version, my bees forage on what they want to, mostly on native bush flowers, but I wouldn’t claim it to be organic honey.
Sell your honey for the best price you can get for it as pure honey.
I can’t tell any difference between my Flow Hive honey and honey from my other hives.
Cheers

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Hit the nail on the head there.

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Flow hive honey should be if anything cheaper because it is easier to extract. Having said that there might be some merit in having less air in it than extracted by spinning.

Also being organic has nothing to do with extraction methods and you won’t have organic honey in urban areas.

What will demand a higher price for backyard beekeepers is usually the fact that the honey is local and not blended. I am moving from Flow hives to traditional and do not expect to sell my honey a cent cheaper.

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Flow honey is certainly the freshest to be had aside from comb honey. The flavor is definitely superior to extracted/spun because of negligible aeration. All the folks I’ve shared or sold it to have told me they’ve never tasted honey like it. I think the price should be a bit higher than traditionally harvested honey because of the freshness and flavor.

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I wonder if your customers are comparing the taste of your honey to the ‘so called honey’ they might have tasted from Super Markets? Sure your honey would taste different, even better, because it is 100% honey and not diluted with the likes of corn sugars etc…
I really can’t tell by the taste if my honey has been extracted form a Flow Hive or a traditional frame that has been extracted. I used to sell them separated but it all sells with the same comments that it tastes so much better than the super market crap. I now am happy to mix both honeys with no negative feed back.
Cheers

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I am trying to think how pure honey (skipping all commercial honeys which mix sugars and who knows what) could be anything other than organic. Only thing I can think of is if you fed the bees with something not organic in or around the hive.

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Organic certification is dependent on the whole “supply chain” being organic. Given bees forage in over a 2km distance from our hives it is very hard to control past and present chemical application, use of gmo’s etc. all of which stop the formal organic certification

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Organic honey cetification

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Wow, that should exclude most beekeepers. Bees can forage up to 5 km from the hive and in a lot of places you would have no way of knowing if adjoining landowners are not organic, trying to be organic or not organic.

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Yep that’s why you don’t really find a lot of organic honey because certification is difficult. You can call it “pure” or “natural“ honey though.

It also excludes all Flow hive owners because it requires comb to be made of pure beeswax, though frames can be plastic.

Still, I think the main advantage of backyard beekeepers is that their honey is boutique and unique to their locality, irrespective of their harvesting method.

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