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#21

Well there you go - I thought everyone knew a fortnight meant 2 weeks. (Thought it was official English). But maybe not so commonly used in the USA @Martha?

One of the differences between “English” in different English speaking countries :slight_smile:

Watching this video, I wonder how many non-Australians and non-English speakers would be able to understand him lol

p.s. @Peter48 I like that your fortnight’s holiday turned into an extended 25 years :wink:


#22

Loved watching the video of the Aussie bushman bee keeper, he was talking pure Australian and “English” speakers wouldn’t click to what he was saying.
Must make your mouth water to hear it spoken the way it was meant to be.
I’ll have to watch his whole series.
Cheers


#23

There was me thinking I had caught you, whats the score now, Dawn about 40 to me zip…:grinning:


#24

Force,

Being User of American English didn’t have a clue on fortnight ! :laughing:. My limey grandma n mom used the term occasionally but I still had not clue n never picked up on it. Only the term is stuck way back there in my gray matter but without definition or connection .

Breaking the word down “fort-night” to study was equally worthless so I’ll take your words on it n quessing not add to my used vocal for the present !

It’s so much fun being here on the forum. Oh ! Watching for Martha’s sack cloth Moo
Moo or what ever that scratchy clothing will be :smiley:.

Cheers n Hugs :hugs:,

Gerald


#25

I am not counting, @Peter48, just having fun with my mates on the Flow forum. :wink:


#26

It is a great forum, so glad I have eventually found it, like the chain pulling too. :wink:


#27

Yes, it’s very interesting.

It is very normal to say “how often do you get paid?”
Answer: “once a fortnight”. / “every fortnight”.
Meaning- (once) every 2 weeks.
Might come down to the fact Aussies shorten everything as much as possible when speaking.

I often have people tell me I don’t sound Australian etc, because they can understand me :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:
But, I have lived with many people from different countries, and Irish parents, so speak with some kind of Irish accent, mixed with Australian, and now maybe Italian?

I have just been watching an Australian comedy called “please like me” - and I wondered where the main actor was from. I thought he looked familiar. Then I heard some more actors speaking, and some references to Brisbane, so I looked up the fellow.
He’s from Adelaide and thus the different accent.

Sorry for the digression @bkp9088 - I hope you got your answer amonst all this talk of fortnights, etc.


#28

It is hard sometimes to speak in “Universal English” as if us Aussies spoke our lingo it wouldn’t be followed, crikey mate, it’s like, we have buggered “English” up but we still understand our selves, I figure, sort of…
Regards Gerry


#29

Peter,

10/4 Bro ! It was a challenge listening to my grandma … She used a lot of words I was familiar with n some I wasn’t !

Now I know bonnet is hood of a car, Bobbi is a police , cinema is a movie (we have used that term here for years) n so on. My mother was my translator around granny.

At this stage of the game I’ve got most of the words figured. But to make things more interesting I’m still learning Vietnamese… I have two adopted daughters thus the interest n need. My Vn family respects me for even attempting their tonal language at my age. And my Vn is rather crappy but I survive :grinning:.

Have a great weekend bro ! Chúc Peter một Cuời Tuán tốt lắm !

Cheers,

Gerald


#30

Sometimes just being naughty. :slightly_frowning_face:I was going on to say “and need a good spanking :disappointed_relieved:” but in these times that would an assault :upside_down_face::upside_down_face:


#31

I had to look up “limey” Gerald. Apparently it means English person. Well there you go :wink:


#32

I saw this when it came out. I’ve also seen a heat gun used on dry caps and the heat gun works much better!


#33

Faroe,

Yaaah ! Never tried to look :eyes: that up but guessing that’s it n dear Mom (always loving n helping her friends n neighbors) wasn’t what we call politically correct! But we watched all the British Royal coronation n weddings via TV :tv: n heard on radio :radio: before. My could she sing “God bless the Queen” as easy as our American national Anthem… and see taught me to watch the bees :honeybee: n encouraged me to do well in beekeeping in Jr n Sr High School … Not forget my Limey heritage!


Cheers :clinking_glasses:,

Gerald


#34

@Martha Now I savvy with the help of the diagram. I would like to see that :sunglasses: OMG I’m 70 and can still enjoy a nice pair of legs. Can I say that these days without being a sexist. :thinking:
Regards


#35

worry not Peter. I like looking at people too. I grow weary of all the PC limits. I choose to gird my loins open and freely to expose my legs. :smiley:


#36

Why would we bother saying fortnight when we can just say 2 weeks :v:️:slight_smile:️

Some folks here in the US of A know that and many other quaint, fuzzy English terms like it, and have fun using them in the appropriate context, Revolutionary War reenactments :smile::drum::us:


#37

If you have them show them freely, be proud and not constrained by all this pc rubbish. Can we blame Dawn for this thread changing, thanks Dawn !!!:smile:


#38

Phew , my legs have just turned to jelly… and my heart is racing so fast. :flushed: :hot_face: But then I am a bit older than Peter so I am allowed a little leeway. :wink:
Goodness knows what with our Dawn and Eve, now my days are even more exciting.:blush::blush::blush::blush: