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Hive inspection pics

Would someone take a look at these pics and give me some feedback?

Thanks so much

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Nice queen, all looks good to me, but I’d clean out the tray more often.

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Hi @Marc1, lovely pictures, thank you for the effort.

Photo 1 - Beautiful queen dead center. Looks like at least one attendant had DWV though. I would do an urgent mite count with sugar roll or alcohol wash and treat ASAP if the mite count is high

Photo 2 - Capped brood and a smeary patch in the lower right. Can’t see it properly in the light, but it could be SHB damage, or it might just be bad light.

Photo 3 - same as photo 2

Photo 4 - corner of a frame with dry capped honey

Photo 5 - same as 4, but capped brood in the distance

Photo 6 - confluent capped brood. Very healthy

Photo 7 - same comments as for 6

Photo 8 - Capped brood and empty cells. May have eggs or uncapped larvae, can’t tell from this magnification. Doesn’t look worrying

Photo 9 - frame of lots of bees, Some brood under them. Can’t see most of the contents of the frame

Photo 10 - bottom tray? Too out of focus to help much. Sorry :wink:

Just my thoughts. :blush:

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I cant thank you enough for your review!
I love this forum and the great people on it!

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Thanks Stevo will def clean up the tray

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I check mine frequently because my hives are close and we have significant beetle problems here, but I give them a good wipe out every week or so as I find pollen goes moldy quite fast especially if there’s moisture in the tray.

I’m also a plumber so have a thing about good sanitation :grin:

Hi Marc. Great pictures. Just one question from me. The dead bees in your bottom tray and idea how they got in there? I’ve never had any dead bees in that tray as the metal mesh floor doesn’t allow them to get through.

Just curious :ok_hand::+1:

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I concur with the findings to date! Great looking population and laying :sweat_smile::raised_hands: just take your mite control steps ASAP as dearth will be upon us and mite population with begin to explode - nothing sadder than a bustling hive dwindling to nothing by October.