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HOW to feed - looking for guidance

I need someone to walk me through this step by step…
I have the FlowHive 2 - just as it came.

I installed a nucleas yesterday. So now the brood box, cover and roof are on there.

I need to feed the bees. I do not want to use an entrance feeder (although I have one). SO…since I do not have another brood box I am trying to figure out a solution.

Could I put a shallow dish with twigs in it - and sugar/water in it, remove the hole cover on the box cover and then cover with the peaked roof??? So my setup would be brood box / cover with hole open / shallow dish with sugar/water / roof.

???

Any other ideas?

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You can use a jam jar with a tiny hole in the lid inverted over the hole in the crown board. I guess the bigger the jar that will fit in the roof cavity the better. Anyway it’ll be easy to change the jar because you can lift the roof without disturbing the bees. You might want to wear a veil when you change the empty jar for a full one.

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Hello Dawn, I would do as Jeff has advised but make about 6 to 10 holes in the lid, a hammer and a thin nail will do the job. Make a 1:1 white sugar and water syrup and stir till the sugar has dissolved. That will stimulate the bees into producing wax.
Don’t use an entrance feeder, it is like a magnet to bees from other hives and can result in a robbing frenzy.
If the bees ignore the syrup then stop feeding them because they will prefer to forage for nectar over the syrup.
Welcome to the forum, lots of reading here and some great folks happy to help you along the journey.
Cheers

For Jeff and Peter - maybe I’m a nut (comes with being new) - but it is ok to put the jar over the hole? It won’t drip on them?

It will spill out the holes but then only droplets will form over the holes that the bees will drink up the syrup. Small holes and put water in the jar and test, you can always increase the size of the hole, but if the hole is too big it is hard to reduce the hole.
Your not a nut Dawn, your just learning new things, and happy to help. No question is silly, ok…
Cheers

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That’s my reason for only one hole. One is good to start with, then you can go to more if you think they need it. The bees will drink it from the hole/s. I suggest to put the nail from the outside in, so that the bees wont get cut on the sharp edge sticking down like they would if you were to put the nail from the other side. Otherwise you could flatten the bur with a hammer, leaving a tiny hole without a bur.
.

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Here ya go:

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A resealable plastic bag (Ziploc) works beautifully under the peaked Flow roof with no need to shim up extra space. Make up your sugar water and pour it into a quart-sized baggie. Seal and place on the inner cover, being sure not to block the hole. It’s okay if it overlaps the hole a little, as long as bees can still come up. With a sharp new razor blade, make two or three slashes on the upper surface of the bag, about 2 inches long. VERY gently push the air bubbles out of these openings, being careful not to let too much sugar water slosh out.

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Thank you. My problem is that I don’t have an empty box. BUT this is great - and am working on a box. :slight_smile:

Thank you!!! This is happening today.

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Sure thing - simple & easy. Here’s a link to an older post of mine, in case you - ahem - somehow end up with more than one colony in the future :wink:

I have a few of these handy feeder rims that are inexpensive, take up little space, and add just enough space for baggie feeders and pollen patties without creating too much dead space that can be a problem in colder weather. This spring I found yet another use for them when housing a swarm and had no bottom boards - I put a feeder rim with the hole open and in front directly on top of another hive’s outer cover, then stacked the new brood box for the swarm on top of that.

You just use your (empty) flow super as the box. It works well as you can use the windows to see if the bees have finished the syrup.

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