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Sentinel hives for pest detection


#1

Thought this might be of interest. Sentinel bee hives are being used in Australia to monitor for varroa.


#2

We have them here in UK for SHB and sentinel traps for V Velutina.


#3

I’m confused about the pest strip that only kills varroa. Can anyone please explain what that is?

I see the guys have been supplied with nice new gloves and bee suits too. Anyone know please where you can get those red gloves with the extra strong looking wrist guard?


#4

Good question. I bet they are talking about Amitraz (Apivar) or MAQS, but either way, the statement is not truly accurate.

I don’t like the red gloves for 2 reasons. First, it looks like they don’t seal at the top. Second, bees see red as black = threat. Not a great concept. :blush:


#5

actually those gloves look bespoke when I look more closely. I now own a pair of bespoke gloves. I had a wrist guard added yesterday as I kept getting stung through the canvas just after the end of the leather and before the cloth of the suit.


#6

Hiya Dan, I have a pair of gauntlet pig skin TIG welding gloves soft and supple yet strong and durable… Not as sweaty as rubber either.


#7

Elastic at the top? I had pigskin added to mine, over the canvas.


#8


My jacket goes over the gauntlet with the elastic on the wrist


#9

Haven’t tried the new covering yet, but I doubt they will get through them - for a while anyhow.


#10

Heavens @skeggley @Dan2
Gloves!
Put nitriles in top and you’ll stop nasties getting from hive to hive and you’ll keep the gloves supple and never have to wash them


#11

That’s a bloody good suggestion…I wish I read it earlier…like a year or two ago! Thanks @Dee!


#12

I dont think it is a case of if varroa enters Aus, more a case of when.
The code of practice makes it compulsory to do at least 2 varroa inspections for all bee keepers annually.

If anyone hasnt read it here is a link
http://beeaware.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Australian-Honey-Bee-Industry-Biosecurity-Code-of-Practice.pdf


#13

@220

Hi Sean, I’m confused as to whether all of it is mandated?


#14

Hi Dee…is this because they are dirty looking (disease transmission etc.) rather than the sting issue? So are you saying I should put a big washing up type glove over the existing gauntlet glove?


#15

From the 2017 COP;
‘Until the Code is mandated, compliance with requirements that are not already a part of state or territory law will be voluntary and beekeepers will be helped with their understanding of, and compliance with, the Code’s requirements by a team of Bee Biosecurity Of cers employed through the industry- funded National Bee Biosecurity Program. It is anticipated this phase-in time will be approximately 24 months. The aim is not to punish beekeepers but to positively assist all beekeepers in raising the overall level of pest and disease management across Australia.’


#16

I’m still not sure myself Dan, the idea was to have all states adopt the code within 2 years. NSW DPI reference the code but I cant find anything to say it has been adopted as the minimum standard.
Not sure on other states but the department in charge of beekeeping in every state were involved in its development.
Really there is nothing in the code that active beekeepers wouldnt be doing as part of their normal inspections and record keeping apart from the mite inspections.


#17

I don’t believe the entire code is mandatory in Tasmania yet. Hives in your backyard don’t need to be registered here either as I understand it.


#18

No not a washing up glove a thin blue Nitrile glove
I use nitriles only, two pairs so that I can change the top pair between hives.
I do have a pair of gauntlets like your that I use for hot hives. I always put a pair of the same gloves I use on their own on top (larger size)
It keeps the gloves clean