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Encouraging news for Oxalic Acid users


#1

#2

Not approved yet, but they will only know what you did if you 'fess up… :smiling_imp:


#3

As long as you don’t call it a mite treatment, it’s ok. I was bleaching my woodenware for years before OAV became “approved”. The bees just happened to be in the box when I did it lol

I don’t think powdered sugar is approved either or most essential oils:


#4

Lots of “people science” research going on here in uk with folk trying all sorts of matrix to soak up the glycerin/oxalic
All illegal, of course…


#5

How is it “illegal?” Is “not approved” different than "illegal?

When I have a cold, I take a shot of brandy. It opens me up and helps me sleep. Brandy is “not approved” as a cold medication. So far, the authorities have not found out and arrested me.


#6

In the uk there is one licensed formulation of oxalic. It’s called Apibioxal and comes pre-measured in little sachets of 2.3 grams as presumably beekeepers cannot be trusted to measure out the correct amount for a standard National hive. It comes adulterated with silica and glucose so it’s hopeless in a vaporiser. We are not allowed to use any form of oxalic treatment in our hives apart from this stuff. It’s beaurocracy gone mad but the Veterinary Medicines Directorate is full of jobsworths and hobby beekeepers WILL be targeted and made an example of. The VMD has just won a very high profile case against a bee farmer here. He didn’t break any law apart from a technical one and the judge reaching his decision said the whole case was a waste of time. This was reflected in the fine. The VMDs cost were over £100K though so again the public pay.


#7

Seems much simpler than using the vaporizer. It also seems like it would be less invasive for the applicator too. For the small scale beekeeper like myself this seems like it is worth a try. Am curious to see how well this will work. May alternate with this method and fogging mineral oil.


#8

Red,

We use the vaporized method up here in the State of Washington now. I used it on my remaining three hives as the temps were too chilly in mid December here near Seattle for other methods. My bees seem to be pulling thru … Full Spring n full inspection will tell the story as it warms up here in the Cascade foothills.

Ta Ta,
Gerald


#9

Hmmm. Seems I have all three items on hand already.


#10

Let us know how the baking goes @Bobby_Thanepohn!!


#11

Two video’s I found today to add to this discussion!


#12

Thanks for posting this
I see he says the treatment is experimental and he doesn’t count mite drop so I guess he doesn’t know if it works.
Seems much more of a palaver than a hot iron for a hobby keeper.
For commercial use the Sublimox does the trick quickly


#13

Formulas appear to be similar to the paper towel method described above. I like the idea of using the fogger though. Definitely faster and I would imagine one would get similar results to using the iron and oxidizing the oxalic acid. He also stated that he was going to post results from his sticky boards.


#14

Can the Oxalic Acid fogging method be used with the super in place?


#15

You are not supposed to. I have used it with a traditional super in situ. There is more Oxalic in a carrot than would ever be left in a vaped super but the law is the law so…I just don’t sell that honey. It is ridiculously easy to just remove the super while you do it though. The non treated bees in the super or out foraging will pick up oxalic from their sisters and their hive


#16

OK sounds good thanks a lot!