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Flow frame vertical gap


#1

Hello, I’ve got my flow frame ready and noticed that I have a 1/4" gap when I have all the flow frames pushed together. Is this to big???


#2

Where is the gap? Photo would help. :blush:


#3

Here is a picture of my question.


#4

Does this picture help?


#5

Very much so, thank you! That gap looks big enough for bees to escape though. If you don’t want to “shim” it, then just make sure you suit up when you harvest and harvest using an enclosed tube/container etc so that you don’t drown bees in the honey.


#6

I would try and center the frames to lessen the gap on one side. Small gaps between the frame end windows will be filled with propolis too, so ‘spreading’ this gap across the frames may also be an option.


#7

Hi @Chrisb53 Looks too big, here is a photo of my cedar flow hive, is yours the hoop pine hive maybe some manufacturing tolerance?
Do as @RBK and @Dawn_SD suggests.



#8

No, mine is the cedar.


#9

Shim it or spread them a bit. Make sure you have the set screws in the rear adjusted so that the flow frames sit tight against the front of the box. Otherwise the bees climb thru and make a mess of the fronts of the flowframes. Ask me how I know this… (◔_◔)


#10

Hi again, just to follow up. The nice folks at flow are sending me some comb guides to use as shims, should only take one or two to close this gap.

Gotta say they were very responsive and kind about this situation and I really appreciate that.


#11

I’m concerned about the gap in mine as well. DSC_0043|690x459


#12


#13


#14

They don’t appear to be hanging vertical and maybe some overlaps between frames (like between 1&2 when looking left to right) and that is why you are getting the large gap. I would look at adjusting the flow frame screws and positioning the frames vertically to close the gap up.


#15

Thanks, Adam. I’m not actually the beekeeper, so I will let her know. IF she’s unable to take care of it, will it pose a threat for the honey? We haven’t had a harvest yet.


#16

For storage of honey, no. For harvesting, it will allow bees out of the back of the hive and straight into the collection jar, unless you use a closed system. I would definitely fix it before harvest.

I agree with @AdamMaskew too, it looks like a couple of frames are overlapping - if you number them from left to right, 2 and 4 both seem to be protruding more towards the back of the hive. The frames can best be realigned as he describes, but in a pinch, you can use the blade of a hive tool on the frames through that observation window that you have open in the photo. Just manipulate the tool until there is no more than a 2 or 3mm (1/8") between each frame. With a gap of that size or smaller, bees should not be able to exit from the back.


#17

As Dawn and Adam said. Adam pointed out why this occurred (failure to adjust the screws in the front top of the flow frames for alignment of ‘viewing window’) and Dawn gave you a solution without taking it all apart at this stage.
I too would try to use a hive tool to align the frames so you get them flush. If you have remaining space on one side, just stick a thin slice of wood into the gap to help the bees sealing it.
It’s easy to miss this essential alignment if it’s your first time with bees and your first flow hive. Best to fix ASAP.