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Should I have a brood & a super to begin with? Or let my colony fill the brood first?


#1

I have just received my first bee box… ordering a 3 flow pack to get started. Was wondering If I need to start with a brood box then add a super later? will it hurt or be detrimental to have the bees in a brood box and a super available to them all in one?


#2

Quick answer would be to fill up the brood first. and while you are waiting for them to do that, join the local beekeeping association and to a beekeeping course :slight_smile:


#3

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#4

Philip, thanks for the quick answer…and there are no bee clubs in my area. One bee keeper that is a little on the recluse side…but I am learning some things from him.


#5

have not gotten any bees yet…just put together my langstroth hive (deep 10) and getting ready to go swarm hunting. Kind of missed the bee shipment cycle plus they are a little pricey… 185 for a nuc.
I am building my super and frames…I have read and researched enough and found references to the answers I have received from this forum.


#6

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#7

@Bob_s G’day Bob. I assume you bee chap is by you in CA. Are you away from the Almond areas? Just curious.

If your bee Chap or contact you get the bees from should be able to tell you more about where the bees were bred and if they are similar locality to you able to tell yo what to expect from your climate.

If you buy a package if bees they will need to build up comb and it will take a few weeks in your climate I’m guessing. It will take the Queen 6 weeks minimum to have a decent replacement of the bees - bee live cycle from egg (worker) is 3 weeks - you need to understand the life cycle.

If you are getting a Nuc then I would expect 4 - 5 frames of Brood and stores with a laying Queen again you need to build up numbers but with a Nuc you have a head start - the comb is built to kick you off but they will need to build up the remainder of an 8-10 frame Lang before you put the supers on.

The bees need to feed themselves and build comb which is expensive on stores 1lb of wax to fill a couple of frames will take 6-8 lbs of honey (to put it in perspective) and the forages will be feeding the colony not just making wax - they also need pollen to feed the brood nest and for the queen to lay well


#8

Most of beekeeping is managing space. The closer it is to what the bees can manage, the better. Don’t give them more room than they need.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesspace.htm


#9

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#10

$185.00 is an average for suppliers that I have found so far for 2-3 pounds of bees w/queen.


#11

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#12

@Valli Goo evening Valli. I have not reached out to bee chap, but will. I am near alfalfa fields and a few pistachio orchards.

After researching many articles, videos, and bee keepers accounts I have gained a reasonable insight to begin a hive and some general management of hive techniques. This is a new direction and experience for me and it has many different needs and demands. There is much more to learn and a lot of time consuming actions.

I do know that in order to have a well balanced, happy, and productive have the brood must be thriving and functional. Drone reproduction, comb development, honey production, and size/quantity.

My goal is to get at least 1-3 broods to a stage to add a super before winter months set in. If not… winter broods may be a challenge… but not impossible. I am optimistic to be able to see honey production in a super before winter. Time will tell and I just want happy thriving bees, we really need them.
:slight_smile:


#13

USD , a couple bee farms from East coast and mid west USA


#14

@jape Wow! That is a little bit of coin…but here in the US it can be around the same price. I have been researching many different suppliers and offers…I ordered a brood box (precut, not assembled) and I will get that going here this week. Not quite ready for a complete Flow Hive (brood & super with frames)… just getting started. I must start at ground level and grow with my bees in order to properly learn my lessons as I progress through this years cycle and growing stages. This is a new class and lots of homework to study!


#15

Bob,

As others have wisely wrote. Start with the deep brood box… $170 plus is what I’m paying each for three 5 frame Nuc.

Read up on bees in a couple book beekeeping books. And there are a lot of great, okay n not so great vids. But you can work your way thru. Keep good records of what works n what does.

Good luck n happy beekeeping !
Gerald


#16

@Gerald_Nickel Thank you and I am an open book for knowledge and voices of experience. I see a great set of opportunities raising bees in my area and the biggest one is being able to contribute to our and their life sustainment.


#17

Bob,

Great outlook n choice ! I’m looking forward to beekeeping once again. Love watching the busy GIRLs !

Very white n frosty sunrise here today. Hive tops were white . :four_leaf_clover: Take care n Happy St Patties Day ! :four_leaf_clover::four_leaf_clover:. Gerald


#18

Got my brood box ready…and it was a nice 85Deg. F today…62 this morning…where are you located at to have frost this time of year? Southern Hemisphere?


#19

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#20

Bob,

I live in the eastern foothills 20 plus miles SE of Seattle, Wa. Yes … Our early Spring Wx is dotted with a few mornings of chilly n frosty temperatures. This years winter has been very mild but record WET ! Yesterday’s low as noted was 30.0 dgs F but this morning the low I recorded to Noaa was 45.5 dgs n should warm up into the mid 60’s. That’s pretty mid for our region. We have a short season for our bees so early management is a must on any day near the 50 dgs mark. It can be challenging and the “Girls” can be a little “Testy” having a cool draft chill them :smiley:… But early peeps are necessary to make sure they are healthy n enough honey or supplies to get thru our off/on fickled pre-Spring.

I have been logging Wx data here for a lot of years n hopefully this will help me better help my bees knowing general trends n Wx incoming across the Pacific at our region.

Have a great Friday n weekend ahead !
Gerald.