Honeyflow.com | FAQ's | Community |

8 Frame, or 10 Frame which do you prefer?


#1

My dad and uncles experience with hives has always been with the 10 Frame Langstroth hives. And I know that the hive coming to me will be 8 Frame hives.

Is there a reason why one of these is “better” or “worse”? What are the strengths and weaknesses of the different sizes?


#2

The main difference I see is the weight. Honey is heavy, a full super can be hard to lift if you are not used to heavy lifting, the 8 frames help shave a little weight off. I’m sure we will hear a few more differences form some more experienced beekeepers.


#3

I wholeheartedly agree with Jake, the 8 frame hive could be up to 5 kg (11 pounds) lighter, not good for the old back, as far as I know that is about the only difference. As mine are in the backyard and I don’t need to go far, I’ve gone for 10 frames as you get 2 more brood per box and 2 more honey frames per super.


#4

All of my gear is 10f rame - I believe giving the girls a bit more space in the brood chamber (I run brood chambers at 2x deeps) gives the queen more laying space - therefore less prone for swarming - But with the increased number of bees you need to work the hive a bit more, stacking supers on top etc

Regarding the weight I’ve been using WSP frames for the honey supers instead of deeps, they shave the same amount of weight off as if going 8 frame deeps, but I get the increased brood space and as such, a bigger honey harvest!

If going 10 frame gear with the flow hive, I would recommend having 3 boxes instead of 2 (flow frames up top) just so you will have space in the hive for the bees :wink:

Note: don’t add all the boxes at once, let them fill the second box first before adding the flow box

Cheers,

The Bunyip Beekeeper


#5

Less lifting with the Flow frames, just crack and drain. Unless you’re relocating for pollen…


#6

Less lifting as in not having to stack multiple supers yes - But you still need to lift the super with flow frames off the hive to gain access to the brood chamber to inspect the brood for disease etc…


#7

@TBB too right, goes with out saying :smile:


#8

http://www.bushfarms.com/beeslazy.htm#lighterboxes

Standard 10 Frame boxes
Name(s) Depth Weight full of honey Uses
o Jumbo, Dadant Deep 11 5/8" 100 - 110 pounds Brood
o Deep, Langstroth Deep 9 5/8" 80 - 90 pounds Brood & Ext
o Western Bee Supply 7 5/8" 70 - 80 pounds Brood & Ext
o Medium, Illinois, 3/4 6 5/8" 60 - 70 pounds Brood & Ext & Cmb
o Shallow 5 ¾" or 5 11/16" 50 - 60 pounds Cmb
o Extra Shallow, ½ 4 ¾" or 4 11/16" 40 - 50 pounds Cmb

8 frame boxes:
o Jumbo, Dadant Deep 11 5/8" 80-88 lbs
o Deep 9 5/8" 64-72 lbs
o Western Bee Supply 7 5/8" 56-64 lbs
o Medium, Illinois 6 5/8" 48-56 lbs
o Shallow 5 3/4" or 5 11/16" 40-48 lbs
o Extra Shallow 4 ¾" or 4 11/16" 32-40 lbs

Keep in mind that the extra weight you eliminated was the two frames furthest from your body when you’re carrying the box. In other words the two with the most leverage against you.


#9

I prefer 10 frame hives over 8 frame hives, I only use 1 super for brood & I use 9 frames in a 10 frame super, so that extra one frame helps. Plus I like the 9 frames of honey in a 10 frame super.