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Just some Flow Hive Spirit fun and games


#21

I totally want this patch! smoke%20um


#22

How is this done and why? image


#23

Can’t begin to tell you why, but how it’s done is there’s a queen in a cage positioned on the man’s neck or thereabouts :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:


#24

Caption this! I’ll give it a shot. Lovin me some babees


#25

“If I hug this bee tightly, she won’t be able to sting me!”


#26

Bee mine babee <3 :slight_smile:


#27

Happy Easter!image


#28

A fellow in my face book posted this pic as he’s a swarm catcher. He got the hive but the big question is how many queens? I would have tried a new clean trashcan to collect them but what do I know?! How would you have approached this?


#29

The good thing about this one is that it is low to the ground. No need for a ladder. :smiley:


#30

It filled 10 10 frame deep brood boxes.


#31

You can’t tell. Plus the size of the swarm doesn’t tell you how many queens, it could be just one. Even if it is many, Hilary (@Girl_Next_Door_Honey) has video footage of the swarm deciding to ball multiple queens while still in “swarm mode”. Game of Thrones happens all the time in the bee world! :blush:

Good choice - I used to use an old style (round with handles, not wheelie-bin) trash can for swarms. I don’t collect swarms in San Diego, because around 60% are Africanized and my hive locations are urban = not nice for neighbors if the bees have attitude.


#32

He got them to march in a hive.


#33

Holy moly, was that in Tennessee near you Martha?


#34

That was in Northern California posted by a fellow in a bee group on facebook. It filled 10 brood boxes!


#35

You are one funny person. Hilarious post,


#36

Dance for your bees! LOL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_4BSoXSoc4


#37

This weekend I went to the Jeep Invasion in the Appalachian Mountains in beautiful Tennessee. While there driving through the mountains there were lots of road side vendors selling homemade organic goodies. The fields were beautiful and there are things farmed here like sorghum and maple syrup and an assortment of things and I tried some honey from a Mennonite vendor. I tasted of his wild flower honey and it was great and I told him I too tend bees. He asked “did you get any honey?” I answered “yes, it’s subdivision honey and it was great too!” Well we laughed as it was funny and yet truthful. But I must say, it was a tiny hit to my ego in a fun way. :smiley:


#38

Good one Martha!! :joy::joy::joy:


#39

I know right? But the truth is … it is subdivision honey! It’s no Appalachian Mountain wild flower honey!


#40

Nope! Mine neither - pure, sweet subdivision honey :houses: