Honeyflow.com | FAQ's | Community |

Very Small Bee Suit


#1

Does anyone know of a supplier that has extremely small size Beekeeping Suits? I’m talking something most people might consider a children’s size. Or a suit I might be able to easily alter (I do know how to sew)? I’m a petite person, even the Flow XXS looks to be way too large. For example, my cuff to nape measurement is 25 in (63.5 cm), nape to crotch is 22 in (55.9 cm).


#2

These guys have children sizes:
http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com/Beekeeping-Supplies/departments/10/

Dawn


#3

Just had a quick scout through www.kelleybees.com and www.mannlake.com, and they both have small and children bee suits. Suggest you look at the web site and size charts, then call their customer service if you have questions. I have dealt with all 3 companies, and they are all pretty helpful.

Dawn


#4

Just remember that you will be wearing clothes under your bee suit (especially in the cold). So we recommend (for our bee suits) - one or 2 sizes bigger than what you would normally wear because of this.

Also, if you look at our sizing chart - it’s a measure of the fabric, so again, we recommend adding 15cm to this to accommodate your actual height, etc. It’s better to be too big, rather than too small.

It’s not exactly a Friday night evening dress :wink:

Or as Dawn has said - you could order a children’s bee suit if that’s what is good for you :slight_smile:


#5

Faroe,
I do hope the flippancy is not an indication of the general response I will receive from the FlowTeam if I encounter future problems. I am not an idiot, nor am I looking for something to fit like “an evening dress”. I am 5’ 2" (157.5cm), basically my total height is shorter than the clothing portion of the smallest offered size. I am looking for something I will not be swimming in or tripping over. I did look at the fabric chart and I fully understand the need to fit loosely over clothing. All that extra material at the crotch is beyond uncomfortable while the excessive length at the cuff will make any sort of interface with gloves extremely difficult due to the extra bulk, and that assumes the closure at the wrists and ankles can even reach a small enough circumference to prevent gaps.


#6

Dawn,
Thank you. That type of direction was exactly what I was looking for.


#7

I use velcro straps designed for cyclists’ trousers/pants, if I have really cranky bees. Usually don’t need them (my gloves all have long gauntlets), but they work well, and they are very cheap.

Dawn


#8

I’m sorry if you found my response “flippant”.
I was not assuming you were an idiot. I was just explaining everything, because I have had this question a lot.
A lot of our customers were confused with our sizing chart, and our sizing in general. This is why I spelt it out in plain english.

I’m sorry if you found it offending. I am just trying to do the best job that I can in explaining things in a clear way.

As for my dress comment; this was just put in as an example, of the fact that the bee suit shouldn’t be tight fitting.

I hope you have a good day/night wherever you are :slight_smile:


#9

I’ll pick some up next time I’m at REI. Thanks!


#10

In Faroe’s defense, let me give you a little background. She really isn’t being flippant, but she does have a highly-developed and very Australian sense of humo(u)r, which is a little different from the US, and perhaps a bit closer to the British.

The Flow team had a huge problem with people ordering bee suits which were several sizes too small. This was not their fault, more it is a problem with beekeeping equipment manufacturers’ traditions. Bee suits are not sized to go over clothes. If you are lazy (which you clearly aren’t) and you just guess and pick a size which you normally wear, rather than measure yourself and use a sizing chart, you are in for a bit of a shock with a bee suit. Most of us wish we were a few sizes smaller than we really are, but for some reason I cannot understand, bee suits seem to be sized as if you are going to use them naked, and never bend over. Better not drop a hive tool! :blush:

So using her unique humor, Faroe was trying to save you from an expensive mistake. I am sure you will understand once you try a few out! :smile:

Dawn


#11

Actually i have just warn undies under mine in the Summer, they get really hot. In Australia they must be like an oven to wear :kissing_closed_eyes:


#12

I always wear long sleeves under my suit, even in the hot summer.
A determined bee WILL get through your suit and that extra layer will save you.


#13

I tried shorts and t-shirt once with our cranky non-african bees. Never again!!! :cold_sweat: The stings didn’t exactly get stuck in my skin, but I got multiple surface skin scratches from each stinger. As there were probably over 50 stings in my suit, that was a lot of red skin. Somehow they seemed to know where the t-shirt and shorts ended and the bare skin started, and they just threw themselves at those spots. I guess that is how they deal with skunks in the US (go for the belly, it is more sensitive).

I am not allergic to bee stings, but it was unpleasant in the extreme. So now I look like the Michelin man in my bee suit. No, I don’t weigh 300 pounds, honest!!! :smile:

Dawn


#14

I go to my girls in bare hands, but not cover my head and they target my hair even if it is tied up. Go figure?


#15

I get it, I really do. I’m not angry, just mildly annoyed and disappointed that I took the time to include measurements and still got feedback that I must somehow be wrong about needing a smaller size. I actually do have to shop in children’s sizes for some things, which is why I mentioned it. Shopping for any sort of clothing is a colossal pain for everyone, especially if you’re not a ‘normal’ dimension. No harm done, and I appreciate the discussion.


#16

I understand too, although I don’t have the same problem. I am just over 5’ 8", but my mother is tiny. She claims to be 5’ 2" but that must be on a really good day. I can easily rest my chin on top of her head, in fact I have to bend down to do that! :wink:

All of my life she has either bought children’s clothes, or bought something she liked and adjusted it. She taught me to sew. I knew how to thread a Singer sewing machine from the age of 5. She doesn’t like having to do it - it is a lot of work, and it isn’t fair. But I understand your problems, and I am empathic.

I am sure you will be a great beekeeper, and hopefully all of these little bits of information will help you to get a comfortable fit. I am serious about calling the customer service lines of the companies above - they are very professional, and even if they don’t have measurements to hand, in my experience they will get them for you so that you are happy with your order.

All the best,

Dawn


#17

I have purchased child suits from www.beeworks.com


#18

Amazon had a selection of suits, even child sizes. This one says XL, but has options for child size.

Mann Lake has items on Amazon too. Sometimes it is less expensive to buy through Amazon then from the company’s website because of the free shipping aspect.


#19

Based on your posts I would recommend a child’s suit although 5’2 is pretty normal in my mind (my Mom is 5’0 and my wife is 5’5, a whopping 3" taller than you lol. If it were me and I had my heart set on everything “Flow” get the XXS and you’ll be fine. It’s not me though and I’d opt for extra big. My baggy suit has prevented me from receiving any stings this entire year for the first time ever. I have 3 suits and I prefer my Brushy Mountain Ventilated Suit 2 sizes too big over the ones that fit me “just right”. When keeping bees you are going to encounter a “hot” hive where bees will chase you for 100 yards or better. They will be bouncing off of you by the 100’s but you have to accomplish the task you set out to do such as finding the queen and killing her. It’s going to happen and you won’t know when until you crack the hive open and hell has broken loose. Anyway, I want my suit big so I can kneel and still have the suit at the bottom of my ankles and stretch and still have coverage up to the base of my thumbs.
Good luck in your beekeeping endeavor.


#20

Never a truer word.
Always be prepared.