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Keeping the brood and flow boxes aligned


#1

New to bee keeping, have assembled the boxes, how do you keep all of the boxes aligned on top of each other.
tablelands


#2

If you just stack them straight, the bees will use propolis to “glue” them together. This is a plant resin, which is sticky, but can be overcome with correct use of a hive tool. It keeps the boxes pretty much together except in very strong winds. For that, you may want to either put bricks on the hive roof, or strap the hive together with a ratcheting strap. Works well, even in earthquakes and very high winds! :blush:


#3

Dawn is on the right track. In Victoria/Australia I have found it is better to put 2 layers of large concrete hollow bricks on the base (flow hives have a pitched -slope-roof) and it lifts the hives up to a more manageable working height. I then use ratcheting straps also to hold the hives down and it prevents wind or animals knocking them over.


#4

Thanks for this advice, I did think of the ratcheting strap but was concerned that it may damage each end roof slat when tightened. Was thinking of some dowl rods in the sides. I have the pine boxes which may blow over in a string wind. I read in the manual that it advisable to place them under cover. Do most beekeepers do this. It also suggests to paint the pine for longevity.


#5

Once the bees move in and get comb in place they weight a ton and unless it’s very high winds or a big animal you prolly won’t have issues with the boxes going over. You might need to secure the roof, but the ratchet strap needn’t be locked down too tightly to do that, so the eaves should be fine.


#6

Yes. :wink:

It may, but mine is fine.


#7

Thanks Sara by sheltered does this mean under another roof like a small shed or just shade as i was thinking i would need to make another structure to house the hive tablelands

-------- Original message --------
From: sara
Date:04/01/2017 08:18 (GMT+10:00)
To: bobmahaffey@westnet.com.au
Cc:
Subject: [Forum] [Beekeeping Basics] Keeping the brood and flow boxes aligned
sara January 3 Once the bees move in and get comb in place they weight a ton and unless it's very high winds or a big animal you prolly won't have issues with the boxes going over. You might need to secure the roof, but the ratchet strap needn't be locked down too tightly to do that, so the eaves should be fine.

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In Reply To

tablelands               

January 3
Thanks for this advice, I did think of the ratcheting strap but was concerned that it may damage each end roof slat when tightened. Was thinking of some dowl rods in the sides. I have the pine boxes which may blow over in a string wind. I read in the manual that it advisable to place them under cov…
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#8

I know of no one who has their hives under a roof. I don’t suppose it would hurt, and there are interesting bee houses that are structures for multiple hives, but in practice most hives stand out in fields with no extra cover, all year long.


#9

Ok thanks Sara i will paint the outside for weather protection put some ratchet straps around amd place on a solid base

-------- Original message --------
From: sara
Date:04/01/2017 10:30 (GMT+10:00)
To: bobmahaffey@westnet.com.au
Cc:
Subject: [Forum] [Beekeeping Basics] Keeping the brood and flow boxes aligned
sara January 4 I know of no one who has their hives under a roof. I don't suppose it would hurt, and there are interesting bee houses that are structures for multiple hives, but in practice most hives stand out in fields with no extra cover, all year long.

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In Reply To

tablelands               

January 4
Thanks Sara by sheltered does this mean under another roof like a small shed or just shade as i was thinking i would need to make another structure to house the hive tablelands -------- Original message --------From: sara Date:04/01/2017 08:18 (GMT+10:00) To: bobmahaffey@westnet.com.au Cc: Sub…
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#10

You could use these hive clips to hold your boxes together, they are cheap and most beekeeping supply stores sell them.


#11

Thanks looks like it would do the trick

-------- Original message --------
From: Rod Kay
Date:04/01/2017 15:09 (GMT+10:00)
To: bobmahaffey@westnet.com.au
Cc:
Subject: [Forum] [Beekeeping Basics] Keeping the brood and flow boxes aligned
Rodderick January 4 tablelands: how do you keep all of the boxes aligned on top of each other.

You could use these hive clips to hold your boxes together, they are cheap and most beekeeping supply stores sell them.

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tablelands               

January 3
New to bee keeping, have assembled the boxes, how do you keep all of the boxes aligned on top of each other. tablelands
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#12

Welcome to the group.
I have only been in the game for two months (since loaded the hive), I have a flow hive, I just put the boxes one on top of the other, squared them up by eye and left them, that being said I am on a suburban house block so it is pretty sheltered. I did buy a $5 racket strap from Bunning’s to tie them down but have not used it. As for painting, mine is pine, I painted it with 4 coats of plastic external house paint and left them for a couple of months so the smell would leave, only paint the outside surfaces of the hive.
cheers


#13

Ok thanks for this my hive will be in an area that gets strong winds
Regularly so i think the tie downs are a must was also looking at how the pine would cope but hopefully a few coats if paint will suffice

-------- Original message --------
From: Jeffm
Date:05/01/2017 10:10 (GMT+10:00)
To: bobmahaffey@westnet.com.au
Cc:
Subject: [Forum] [Beekeeping Basics] Keeping the brood and flow boxes aligned
Jeffm January 5 Welcome to the group. I have only been in the game for two months (since loaded the hive), I have a flow hive, I just put the boxes one on top of the other, squared them up by eye and left them, that being said I am on a suburban house block so it is pretty sheltered. I did buy a $5 racket strap from Bunning's to tie them down but have not used it. As for painting, mine is pine, I painted it with 4 coats of plastic external house paint and left them for a couple of months so the smell would leave, only paint the outside surfaces of the hive. cheers

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tablelands               

January 4
Thanks looks like it would do the trick -------- Original message --------From: Rod Kay Date:04/01/2017 15:09 (GMT+10:00) To: bobmahaffey@westnet.com.au Cc: Subject: [Forum] [Beekeeping Basics] Keeping the brood and flow boxes aligned Rodderick January 4 tablelands: how do …
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#14

To Tablelands, (I am assuming Queensland Aust), in regards to positioning it can be under cover or in the open. The important thing to remember is the bees need a clear flight path entry to the front of hive. They do not like obstacles or sharp turn entrances. If you have 10m clear entrance at the front, 2-3 from at least one side and 3-5 metres from behind, you can enter the back of the hive for inspection and honey collections. These are a guide and if you have more room great. This will help keep your bees calm and avoid the need for having to always don a bee suit.

In regards to hives, the flow cedar is a beautiful soft wood and is best stained or preferably Tung oil. The others are made of a hoop pine (usually NZ) which can be painted or stained, but must be coated to protect and preserve. Remember you can always stain first and paint later but not vice versa, or you are in for a lot of sanding. Oils and stains are a lot easier to apply, but once you have painted it is best to continue every 2-3 years.

The other advantage of the block bricks is they allow good ventilation and stop wear and tear on the bottom of the hive. When you put the straps on, make sure the ratcheting buckles are on the non inspection side about half way up to allow adjustment and the straps are to the back and front of inspection portal to allow removal.

Pick a sunny, calm, and preferably mid afternoon when most of the bees are out foraging to place the blocks under the hive in the same place. You can put them right beside the existing, but not more than a metre away or you will affect the bees return orientation.

Hope this is helpful Chris.