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Where is a good place to put your hive


#1

Is it okay to put in my backyard? I live in the city.


#2

You have to check with you region or state - Not sure if anyone else here is from New Mexico - many places in the US have loosened rules for keeping bees but you need to join a local club and the information about how many, where and forage for the bees an 100’s of other questions will be answered


#3

I am from New Mexico.


#4

Depends on your city and local regulations. It is your responsibility to look it up. If you are in the US, there will be regs. A local bee club is your most helpful resource on that.


#5

I don’t think there is a local bee club in my area.


#6

What city is closest to you? Are you in an “incorporated” area?


#7

here you go @Pacen_Hartley http://nmbeekeepers.org/


#8

These are the local regulations for keeping bees in the City of San Diego. New Mexico will have different rules, and cities set their own standards too, but chances are they will be similar.


The distances required from property boundaries are much greater in the unincorporated parts of San Diego, which is why I asked that question. If you call your local city offices, they should be able to give you an internet link to the correct regulations - our office is very helpful.


#10

@Cowgirl We are Lucky here in the UK - I belong to the BBKA (British Bee Keeper’s Association), Part of the membership goes to pay Local, Regional and National membership as well as Insurance and various booklet/magazines and emails for all of them - insurance includes up to 3 hives and extras can be added not problems


#12

Pacen,

As most have written … Please check with your local city government for ordinances on beekeeping. I live in Washington state outside the city limits so my regulations are different to others just a short distance away in the city of Renton here. Usually there are quantity, distance from property lines n/or needed hedge or tall fence barrier if set near or at a property line. These rules are currently changing but each region is really different. Please do some checking to simplify later issues or problems with local government rules n regulations.

Good luck,
Gerald.


#13

Thanks Gerald will do!


#14

. Pacen,

No problem bro ! I can have up to 50 hives where I live but my small housing lot ten hives will be plenty. Here is an example of my personal regulation. Each city near us is completely different.

Cheers bro :honeybee::honeybee:,
Gerald


#15

The rules here aren’t bad at all.
http://www.cherokeebeeclub.com/GA%20Beekeeping%20Laws.pdf

My city has zero ordinances related to bees.


#16

Hi Pacen,

I have been doing a ton of research for you. This is what the NM beekeepers say about keeping bees in your city:

Now, I am not a legal expert, and I don’t live in your state. But from what I read, it is perfectly OK for you to put a bee hive in your back yard. You have to register it with the local department of agriculture, but that is very easy. You might want to check with that bee removal guy I told you about (he is a bee keeper himself, so I am sure he will love chatting about anything to do with bees), but I think you should be fine keeping your bees at home.

Dawn


#17

Maximum of 50 hives on less 5 acres! Crikey.
Colonies in trees constitutes a public nuisance and shall be abated??
So 50 colonies on a 1/8th acre block is fine but a colony in a tree on a 5 acre block isn’t? :scratch head:


#18

Skeggley,

:blush: tree stuff … Guessing that’s some old Government Thinking that was written before our bee drought ! A couple of our local cities have short sightedness still. Until they have interested n knowledgeable people looking at those ordinance n rules they may remain "Head in the sand type ! Progress can remain SLOW until it really effects their dinner plate n wallet ! (Big Shortage) . Thanks for sharing !

:honeybee:wise,
Gerald


#19

It is because the bees didn’t fill out the paperwork to register their hive with the city. They are therefore in violation and must be abated and fined… :smile:


#20

To All,

The wheels of progress move painfully slow. The squeaky wheel gets the grease. In the past Unwitting n usually unknowledge/misinformed people have made up law n rule books n ordinances. As bees n pollenators continue to dewindle n prices of food increase maybe the governments n controlling bodies will rethink their policies. Bland meals with less healthy fruit, veggies, nuts n more will flag a problem. It’s up to individual/beekeeper to do there part to insure the ignorance do not continue. Life is short so be must :honeybee: busy !
Returning to beekeeping even at my golden year (not sure what golden means) is not too late.

Food for thought,

Gerald


#21

More then likely this is the case because wild hives in trees are not being managed, therefore the city is liable for damages or injuries caused by them. So in an effort to not get sued by someone who gets stung they just get rid of them. Abated doesn’t necessarily constitute destroying the hive either. It just means that it has to be removed. It is possible they have beekeepers who take care of such things. You would have to see the cities policy on whether they call an exterminator or a bee keeper before you could really get outraged I think.


#22

Hey Everyone,

I’am new to beekeeping and i just finished my flow hive today! :grin: Now i have a few questions:

Can i use the roof of the flow hive also just for my brood box?

Do i have to oil my flow hive and if yes does it has to be tungoil?

What do you think of my spot for the hive? (not quite finished yet) It has morning sun and its not to exposed to the wind. im not sure if the fence is to close to the hive?

I’m grateful for any help!

happy beekeeping

Florian