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Hi @Peter48 thank you for your reply- Here is a sunny day in Brescia Italy… I am now opening up the big wooden box of the FH 2 cedar wood… putting all pieces on the top of the bed in my spare bedroom… ohhh gosh am I ever able to put this together ?? Hope I don’t go into panic state…
Peter, I notice 2 things… I need to go this afternoon to a hardware store and buy a few things… 1°)-- a light metal square 90° to make sure i am aligned all around–
2°) a problem… :woman_facepalming: I do not have any of the tips to fit on my battery drill for the screws… I never saw any screws with a square top… I have so many types but no square one… I hope they have them here… I will take the screw bag with me and see…3°) From what I read in the forum… when the FH is finish I will rub Tung oil with a cloth on the outside to protect the wood ( but don’t worry Peter… it will not be before ( next year ) ha ha… :rofl: :rofl:

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Thank you Jeff and Peter,
Damn, I hope I haven’t made a rookie error so soon. We didn’t put the honey super on to get the honey early. I don’t mind how long it takes for the honey to become available. We put it on because the brood box appeared to be doing well and there were honey cells, comb being made on top of the frames and on the inner cover and we thought this would assist the bees.
So can we reverse the situation? Take the honey super off? Will the bees return to the brood box if we take flow hive frames out of the super?image

Any good hardware shop will have the square tips to go into the drill and fit the screws. But a metal tape measure to so that you can measure from corner to corner diagonally across the box and the measurements each way should be within 1 mm of being the same.
When you are ready to assemble it spread some newspaper on your kitchen table and assemble it there, you need a flat surface to have everything lines up properly.
You take your time doing it and if you get into a panic call it a day and have a wine or four and leave it till tomorrow. My first Flow hive took me about 5 hours to assemble with lots of reading the instructions and you will find them easy to understand.
If you get stuck do you know how to send a PM (Personal Message)? You can send me one and I can help you figure it out.
There is nothing wrong with your English. :smiley:
Midnight here, good night and cheers.

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I would advise taking the super off till the brood box is busting at the seams then put the super on. Leave it laying on its side next to the entrance to the hive and any bees on it will return to the hive in a couple of hours.
Did you do anything to the Flow Frames to get the bees interested in sealing them up? I used an el-cheapo paint brush and painted some melted wax over the frame cells, doing that gives the bees a ‘homely smell’ and they will use the wax to seal up the gaps in the cells.
Cheers

:kissing_heart: :kissing_heart:Thank you… I phone the builder…he may have what i need… Hope so… Good night !
This is my working area… yes I put up a flat surface to work on… If I use my kitchen table… :smiley: :smiley: I surely end up eating over the kitchen sick for the next few weeks… :woman_facepalming:

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hello,… in Australia you sleep…:bed: and here in Italy i try to work…

I did not look carefully before…taking out all the screws from the little plastic bag needed for the base part…I just found inside the 2 drill head needed for assembling the base…the square and the phillips one-- Fantastic Flow !! :clap::clap:Just what i needed to go on with my work!
I Finish mounting the base.

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Just looking at your photo, it looks like you have a large gap where that frame came from. Also the new comb doesn’t look to be sitting within the frame. To be honest, your better off starting the bees on properly fitted wax foundation. That way you’ll get a high %age of worker comb compared to drone comb. Also the combs will be all built within each frame. Another thing I recommend is to evenly space each brood frame. I leave about 3mm between the frame shoulders as well as the sides of the hive.

Sooner rather than later, you need to check the rest of the frames to make sure you don’t have any cross combing.

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That looks pretty Helene, and a fair start :cherry_blossom: but I see the queen excluder - the thin metal gridded piece - is on top of the hive base. Not sure if you were just placing it there for the picture, but just in case you didn’t know, when you set up your hive for the bees it should go on top of your topmost brood box just below the Flow super. Otherwise, it’s coming along nicely!

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That is the mesh floor on the Flow Hive2 Eva, it sits inside the risers on the ledge. Yes, it looks like a QX but if it was then it would sit on top of the risers if wrongly fitted.
Cheers n a happy New Year to you.

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i was looking at the instruction page for base assembly !! The photo was like this… the metal screen is for the top of the base… Maybe i am doing it wrong…??

I think that the plastic queen excluder is placed on top of the brood box ? that i may put together tomorrow if I have the time…

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You are doing it right so far. The plastic QX will be ok for a year or two but then if will become brittle and break so then I would advise using a metal one. A QX sits on top of the brood box so the queen can’t get up into the super.
When you apply the tung oil to the outside of the hive also put it on the top and bottom edges of the boxes, but lave the inside untreated.
Cheers

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Thank you @Peter48 Eva got me concern,
I may start with the brood box tomorrow…
I also notice that my wood glue was shitty… was white and not transparent… so I have to change that to… I did clean what came out with a damp cloth but you could see the white anyhow… and did not like that… so had to use a knife and clean around…
I will look on internet for a good Tung oil to put on the outside when all finish…
Peter, is it the best oil to use living the FH with natural look but protected from bad weather ? Last month we had 3 weeks of NO STOP RAIN… was a mess… flooding everywhere.
I will surely have to give a few hands of oil… They also told me that it takes a long time to dry up from one hand to the other… ( never used it before ).
We do have quite cold winter with snow and rain a lot… I am also concern about 2 things,
1° is it normal that the brood box sits only on top of the base without anything holding them together ?
2° we have very strong wind storms here in my area as it is very flat… everything blows away outside so my poor FH … :honeybee: :honeybee:
I have to think to fix it on the bottom some how…because I will find pieces rolling on the garden…
Thank you all for your help !
Now I may have to go to sleep,as it is 1,46 am… cheers !

If the glue you have is a PVA glue it is white when it is wet but dries clear. It is a water based glue so you can clean up with a damp cloth and rinsed it well when you have finished.
You can screw and/or glue the base board to the brood box for added security but it would take a fairly strong wind to blow a hive over with the added weight of the bees and honey, but it can happen.
I don’t use Tung Oil, or any other oil, Because of my hot climate all of my hives are painted white. From those on the forum that use it they have good results but it needs reapplying from 6 to 12 months as it looks old and mildew is a problem. I re-coat my hives with paint every 8 to 10 years with an extra coat on the roof. I don’t like the Flow Hive roof and so use what we call ‘migratory roofs’ which are flat.
Cheers

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Peter, I recognize that brood box on the left. A bloke in Nambour uses them. He picked up a few colonies in them.

Thank you Peter,
Onto it. It’s all part of the learning curve.
Many thanks again for your advice.

Danielle

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Yes you’re right Jeff, it is a little wonky.
A bit of tidy up work to do.
Thank you again, much appreciated.

Danielle

You know who makes those boxes in Yandina. A totally useless box when used with his base boards a frame sits on the base board and not on the lugs. Imagine the extra distance a bee has to travel to move from one frame to another by moving along the floor to the end of the frame to get around it. You can easily see the differences in the height in that pic.
Cheers

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Yes I knew that Pete, I studied those hives & I know what you mean. I have a few hives where the brood box sits on the floor. They have an entrance cut out of the bottom of the brood box. The bees seem to work them alright. The bees can get around that by leaving a gap above the bottom bars. It’s how some hives were that were given to me, so I left them like that, except I scraped them out before lightly scorching the insides.

I remember noting one season that my best performing colony was in one of those brood boxes. It only has a 4" entrance in the middle. It was because of that on top of what I’d been reading here that prompted me to start reducing my entrance sizes, especially during the winter.

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